🎁 Gift PawpGet Started

The digital clinic for puppy parents

The best care for your puppy at the best price

24/7, unlimited access to vets and pet experts and a $3,000 safety net for emergencies — all for $19/month.

Get started with Pawp
Puppy

The first year of owning a puppy costs around $1,800.

...with Pawp, you’ll save

$400+

Black lab puppy

22%+

saved on the first year with Pawp

Our puppy experts help you navigate every aspect of being a new pet parent

.

Potty & House Training
Sleeping
Walking
Medication
Destruction
Routine
Proper Play
dog looking up

Personalized care, built with new puppy parents in mind

IPhone
Application screen
Application screen
Application screen
Application screen
Save on your first year

Save on your first year

Save hundreds, even thousands in your first year of puppy parenting with the digital clinic.

Connect with puppy experts who understand

Connect with puppy experts who understand

Our vets and experts are experienced, empathetic, and attentive to all your puppy’s needs.

Get organized & build your routine

Get organized & build your routine

Keep everything you (and others) need to know about your puppy in one place.

Care for your puppy’s mental & physical health

Care for your puppy’s mental & physical health

Our vets and pet experts can advise on medical issues and behavioral questions.

Learn more about your puppy with vet-backed articles & resources

Obedience training

Obedience training

Make sure your puppy learns the right way to behave even when they’re almost too cute to say “no” to.

Teething

Teething

Keep your puppy’s mouth off your stuff with an expert’s guide to managing the destruction of teething puppies.

Potty training

Potty training

Save yourself tears and cleaning supplies by digging into expert advice on potty training your new puppy.

The right food

The right food

Feed your puppy only the best and healthiest food meant for them, as told by vets and nutrition experts.

Puppy 101

clock

8 min

How To Train Your Puppy When They’re So Cute, It’s Hard To Say ‘No’

Read Full Article

Puppy 101

clock

7 min

Puppy Teething: Signs, Training & Pain Relief

Read Full Article

Puppy 101

clock

9 min

How To Potty Train Your New Puppy (When You're Super Busy)

Read Full Article

Puppy 101

clock

6 min

How To Choose The Best Puppy Food

Read Full Article

Frequently Asked Questions by New Puppy Parents

Being a new pet parent shouldn't be stressful. Our Pawp vets are available 24/7 for all your frequently asked questions.

How do you potty train a puppy?


One of the most trying aspects of being a new pet parent is potty training a puppy. Puppy potty training is by no means quick and takes much time, effort, and patience. There are a few different techniques for potty training a puppy. You can use a bell to signify to your puppy that it’s go-potty time. You can use wee-wee pads, a larger playpen, and a crate. You can even tie yourself to your puppy to make sure there’s no unfortunate accidents. While there are a few different ways to potty train a puppy, one thing remains consistent: be kind. Rubbing your puppy’s face in a mess won’t teach them a lesson. It’s all about getting your dog into a routine.

What’s the best food for a puppy?


When it comes to the best food for puppies, there’s a lot of debate. And, of course, there is because puppies are not one size fits all and have different needs, tastes, and appetites. There are, however, some pretty clear things to look for when choosing the ideal food for your new puppy. You should firstly focus on puppy-specific foods and diets as your puppy will need to consume more calories/food in their first few months than they will as adult dogs. Puppy-specific diets will often be high in protein. You should pay attention to this ingredient the most. Is it real meat? Is it AAFCO stamped and approved? Is it full of fillers, food dyes, or chemicals? Does your puppy’s breed require a specific type of food? Choosing the best food for your puppy is personal, but paying attention to the nutrition panel is the best start.

What vaccines should a new puppy get?


Vaccinations are an important part of your puppy’s first few months. Vaccines help to protect your puppy from many diseases they might encounter — especially at the age when they’re truly putting everything and anything into their mouths. Most vaccinations for puppies begin at around 6 to 8 weeks. Then, on average, a puppy will be back at the vet around every two to three weeks for boosters. Most dogs will be finished with their puppy vaccines at around 16 weeks old. Puppies should all get the core vaccines, which are comprised of the DHLPP (distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvo, and parainfluenza), rabies, and bordetella vaccines. There are also additional vaccines that your vet may recommend depending on where you live. It’s also important to get your puppy on different preventatives, like heartworm, a little afterwards (around 12 to 16 weeks).

How often do you take a puppy to the vet?


A new puppy, which is considered such between 0 to 1 year of age, should be taken to the vet immediately after they are either born or adopted (even if you see they already have a clean bill of health). This way your vet can perform a physical and a series of tests that will let you know if anything doesn’t look right. At this first visit, your vet will determine your puppy’s vaccine schedule (and thus your vet schedule), which, depending on your puppy, can mean returning to the vet office every two to four weeks. When a puppy has reached one year of age (or a little sooner for a bigger dog), you will only need to bring your adult dog to the vet around one time per year barring any emergency issues.

Should you crate train a new puppy?


While crate training has garnered a cruel reputation (which can be true if crate training is done poorly), it is a very useful tool to not only provide your puppy with their own personal space, but to ensure they get potty-trained quickly and easily. The perfect crate for your puppy should be neither too small nor too big. If it’s too small, your puppy will be unlikely to use it and if it’s too large, your puppy might use part of it for their business (which we don’t want). The perfect size crate means your puppy or dog has enough space to stand up and turn around. Just like humans, dogs like to have a little space that they can call their own. Make it a special place by providing a special toy or treat that rewards your puppy for getting into the crate. They will learn quickly that this is a place they want to play and sleep, not poop and eat.

Be the in-the-know pet parent.

  • Avoid unnecessary vet visits.
  • Get trusted, independent second opinions.
  • Better understand your pet’s behavior.
  • Ask us the dumb questions.
  • When your vet isn’t there, we are.

Ready to get started with Pawp?

Tell us a little about you and your pet to get the ball rolling.

pawp logo

Quality pet care for a fraction of the cost.

  • Instagram: @pawp
  • Linkedin: @mypawp
  • Twitter: @mypawp
  • Pinterest: @pawp
  • Facebook: @mypawp
GET IN TOUCH
dog