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The online vet clinic for kitten parents

Expert care for your new kitten — without the cost

Unlimited access to vets and pet experts 24/7 and a $3,000 safety net for emergencies — all for $19/month.

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Ginger kitten

The first year of owning a kitten costs $1,200 on average.

...with Pawp, you’ll save

$300+

Tabby kitten

25%+

saved on the first year with Pawp

Our kitten experts are here to help and advise you through every step of pet parenting

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Litter Training
Sleeping
Eating
Medication
Destruction
Routine
Proper Play
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Comprehensive, personalized care for your new kitten

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Save on your first year

Save on your first year

Save hundreds, even thousands in your first year of kitten parenting with the digital clinic.

Connect with empathetic kitten experts

Connect with empathetic kitten experts

Our vets and experts are experienced, understanding, and attentive to your kitten’s needs.

Get organized & build your routine

Get organized & build your routine

Keep everything you (and others) need to know about your kitten in one place.

Care for your kitten’s mental & physical health

Care for your kitten’s mental & physical health

Our vets and pet experts can advise on medical issues and behavioral questions.

Learn more about your kitten with vet-backed articles & resources

Litter training

Litter training

Make sure your new kitten is learning the right way to do their business with these simple litter box tips & tricks.

The right food

The right food

Feed your kitten the best & healthiest food meant for them, as told by vets & nutrition experts.

Indoor vs outdoor

Indoor vs outdoor

Learn the pros & cons of having indoor vs. outdoor cats so you can make the best choice for your kitten.

Building trust

Building trust

See why your kitten may not be bonding right away and how you can help them feel less misunderstood.

Kitten 101

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9 min

6 Litter Box Mistakes You Don't Want To Make

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Kitten 101

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6 min

The Best Cat Foods, Recommended By Vets & Experts

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Kitten 101

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5 min

Indoor vs. Outdoor Cats: Exploring The Pros And Cons

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Kitten 101

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7 min

7 Reasons Your Cat Feels Misunderstood — And What You Can Do About It

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Frequently Asked Questions by New Kitten Parents

Being a new pet parent shouldn't be stressful. Our Pawp vets are available 24/7 for all your frequently asked questions.

How often do you take a new kitten to the vet?


A new kitten, which is considered such between 0 to 1 year of age, should be taken to the vet right after they are born or adopted (even if they already have a clean bill of health). Your vet will be able to perform a physical and some tests so you know right off the bat if anything doesn’t look right. At your kitten’s first vet visit, your vet will also create a vaccine schedule for your kitten, which, depending on your kitten, can mean going to the vet every three or four weeks. When your kitten has reached around one year of age, you will generally only need to bring your adult cat to the vet around one time per year (not including for any vet emergencies).

What’s the best food for a new kitten?


Choosing the best food for your new kitten is a highly personal choice. Does your cat need any extra hydration? Do they need breed-specific food? Kittens should definitely eat a kitten-specific diet that has higher fat and higher protein to help them grow and develop in the first few months of their lives. You should definitely continue to feed your kitten a kitten-specific diet until around 1 year where you may switch them on to a normal adult cat food variety. Good kitten foods will have the AAFCO stamp of approval and will feature mostly proteins over fillers (as cats are obligate carnivores). Good kitten food should also include important vitamins and minerals as well as things like taurine. Many cats don’t drink enough water, so a lot of vets will recommend wet food over dry food to ensure your kitten remains hydrated.

Which vaccines should a new kitten get?


Like puppies, new kittens should be getting vaccines at regular intervals throughout the first fews months of their lives. Immunizations generally start for kittens around 6 to 8 weeks of age and continue until a kitten is about 4 months of age. They require “core” vaccines to protect from the most common diseases: (FCV) feline calicivirus, (FPV) feline panleukopenia, (FHV-1) feline herpesvirus-1, and (FeLV) feline leukemia. The last vaccine is especially important if your kitten will be spending time outside. The rabies vaccine is quite common as well as a few others your vet may recommend based on where you live, like lepto, rattlesnake, or lyme vaccines.

How do you litter train a new kitten?


Litter training a new cat or kitten is a lot simpler than potty training a new puppy. Cats are very clean creatures and they naturally want to do their business away from places where they eat or sleep. The first step to training your kitten to use the litter box is buying the correct supplies. You’ll need an appropriately sized litter box, some cat litter, and a means of scooping it. Allow your kitten to explore their box so they become familiar with it. A lot of cats and kittens already like to bury their business so litter boxes will feel quite natural to them. Place your kitten or cat in the box after they wake up or after they eat meals to encourage them to use it. If you see your cat using other places for a litter box, pick them up and place them in the correct spot. Don’t yell or scream if they don’t get the hang of it immediately either — they won’t get what you’re talking about! Just use patience and treats to reward your kitten when they do the right thing.

Should a kitten get spayed/neutered?


While spaying/neutering a kitten is a personal choice, most veterinarians recommend getting your cat spayed or neutered as there’s an incredibly high population of unowned cats and kittens in shelters and living on the streets. Aside from increasing a kitten’s life expectancy, spaying or neutering a cat can also decrease their risks of developing future health issues. Most vets recommend getting a kitten spayed or neutered around 5 months of age so they’re able to heal faster and can avail from the preventative benefits of early spaying/neutering.

Be the in-the-know kitten parent.

  • Avoid unnecessary vet visits.
  • Get trusted, independent second opinions.
  • Better understand your pet’s behavior.
  • Ask us the dumb questions.
  • When your vet isn’t there, we are.

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Tell us a little about you and your pet to get the ball rolling.

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Quality pet care for a fraction of the cost.

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